The other way to practice.

There are many ways to practice, and I am guessing that many of you are very good at sitting down with the new song you’ve been handed, looking at those unfamiliar chords, and playing (and singing) the entire song from top to bottom. This is just fine, as it helps you to learn those new chords, and it familiarizes you with the song. But if you’re not careful, it will also teach you to reply solely on that piece of paper (or iPad) and you will have a harder time breaking free.

I lead a class every Wednesday called “The All In Good Time Orchestra,” and for the last two weeks I have been celebrating our recent concert by starting our  rehearsals with no stands – no music! When I announced this via email, I received some concerned replies – students were worried that it was going to be too hard. But something wonderful happened.

I asked them what the chords were for a particular song, and after a few minutes, we had remembered all the chords in the right order and timing. What information some people didn’t know, others did, and together we were playing the song – without the music!

Because we weren’t tethered to that paper, we were now able to look up and really play. We worked on “hearing” areas that needed attention, and everyone could better “see” my visual cues. I noticed the quality of our playing increased dramatically. Sure, we will probably use the written music occasionally, but now it will be to refer to, instead of to hold to for dear life.

And now you too, can take this “other way to practice” and apply it to your musical routine. Take one of your favorite songs and see if you can remember the first couple of lines. Look at the music if you have to, and then try to play just a bit from memory. Play that little part over and over… and over, until it gets to be automatic. Then work on the next part the same way. Then add the two together. Continue through the song. Piece by piece. Patiently.

In this way, you are studying the parts of the song – all the little pieces that make up the larger piece. And by doing so, you are developing the muscle memory needed to play the song without thinking about it. When your fingers go to the right chords before you even know it.

That’s when the magic happens.

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